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. >> rose: lakhdar brahimi is here n august he replaced kofi annan as u.s. enjoy to syria, one of the most experienced diplomats in the world. he's deeply familiar with arab affairs. during the 198 0s he was undersecretary general of arab league. in the 1990s he served as algeria's foreign minister. after that he was special envoy to afghanistan and then to iraq post saddal hussein. when he became envoy to syria earlier this year he described his mission as quote nearly impossible. he is in new york this week to report to the united nations and security council on that mission and on the situation in syria. i'm pleased to have him back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you must be exhausted. >> i'm all right. >> rose: what will you say to the united nations. >> you know what, i'm going to tell them what i have been saying all along about the situation in syria is extremely bad. and dangerous. and getting worse. until now nobody has found a way of bringing it under control. we know that this is part of the arab spring. we know that change is coming. but as i think you
now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today are close to the street, ear on the ground, and in their constituencies, they are people whose opinions are sought and whose opinions are listened to. i want to introduce a canadian journalist, she's also a member of the serian national council formed in opposition to assad, holds a bachelor's degree, canadian, a poly-sci degree and working on her ph.d. right now. lecturing in istanbul, the international center for scholars, a special adviser to the turkish president in the snows. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the a
. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish pr
with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. >> are we better off in the middle east now than we were four years ago? absolutely not. why? because the policies of the administration and the way its been handling itself. >> when a president of the united states apologizes to religious fanatics while killing young americans, this is profoundly wrong. >> we would like to hold obama accountable for an absolute disastrous foreign policy. >> greta: president obama starting off the second term with a foreign policy crisis. four americans murdered in libya. the obama administration being hammered for the handling of the terror attack in benghazi. for weeks the administration claiming that the september 11th attacks were a response to a youtube video, same video that sparked violent protests around the world including outside the embassy in cairo. since the arab spring we have seen big changesn the volatile region. how will he handl
the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wallpaper and it has since become more sophisticated and beginning to write articles, the editor is anonymous but they are starting to publish pieces. this thing that was touted early on as being this kind of innovative or new information delivery system is now turning into a more traditional journalistic entity but
for syria. china cannot recently with a four-point plan. did you take this seriously? if so, could this be part of the new normal, china looking at a crisis the west is unable to solve far from its shores and saying, we have a position to take and could play a role on this? >> on to the back row. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> early in the discussion, you had asked about the dispute for the islands. your response was the chinese response was part of a long-term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build an infrastructure to gain access of raw materials. at the same time, we have also seen them a tremendous efforts to build military to military relations. my question for the panel is, is that military dimension just an effort to protect economic interests or is it some part of a long-term plan to help lay the foundations for their assent to the position as a global power? >> one last gentleman and what neil diamond would call the tree people, hot august night. this gentleman. run the microphone to
and syria. the whole house will be united in concern both at the intolerable situation for the residents of southern israel and the grave loss of life and humanitarian in gaza including the particular impact on children. on the 14th of november, the israeli defense forces began air strikein response to a sharp increase in rocket fire. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also lled. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their militaryesponse and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international su
a little bit later in the program. moving on to syria -- "i am not a puppet, and i will live and die in syria," defiant words from syria's president. >> in an interview with the satellite broadcaster of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have a domino impact around the world. we begin with the latest. >> here is where the first protests of assad took place. this video claims to show the result of a government air strike on the city's great mosque. meanwhile, rebels say they have taken one of the two remaining government-controlled posts along the turkish border. in a rare interview, bashar al- assad was defiant. speaking to russian television, he ruled out the possibility he might go into exile. >> i am syrian. i will live and die in syria. >> assad warned the west against military intervention in the country and said such a move would have global ramifications and warned any intervention would have what he called a domino effect. meanwhile, syrian opposition politici
sanctions against syria in their effort to stop its civil war. welcome to nhk world "newsline." representatives of nations putting the squeeze on the syrian government have met all over the world. their latest gathering brought them here to japan. the delegates worked on their strategy to push president bashar al assad out of office and ultimately end the bloodshed. on one hand, they're strengthening sangings. on the other, they're reaffirming their support for opposition forces. nhk world's akira saheki reports. >> reporter: delegates from more than 60 countries are attending the conference, including representatives from the gulf region and the west. they've met several times before, but this is the first time they've gathered in asia. the japanese government hosted the conference to help broaden the base of international support for sanctions against syria. >> translator: the international community has been asking the syrian government to end the violence. but the assad regime is continuing the fight, ignoring the sacrifices of its people. we need to unify our efforts and
, dropped by a syrian air force jet, right on the border, about 10 meters inside syria. but very close, close enough to smash windows from the explosion in the adjacent turkish town and also causing a number of civilians to flee across the border. last thursday some been -- something like 9000 crossed the border. rebels of taken hold of it and now the government is struggling to dislodge them. and the battle goes on. extremely close to turkey. golan heights, the request of the ceasefire line on sunday -- an indication this war is very close to the border, sometimes spills over. but i think in both cases, the israeli case and the turkish case, neither of the two countries is looking to get embroiled in the struggle inside syria. they are watching it very closely. they have responded to things coming across the border in the immediate area, but they are not interested in blowing this up and starting a more general conflict with the syrian armed forces. >> we have also heard that under great arab and western pressure, the new opposition group -- putting aside the differences, the various
where tension is rising after israel and syria exchange fire across their border. in china, it's all change at the top. we have a special report on how the next generation is determined to tread its own path. >> i would like to be a software engineer. >> so you don't want to do the sort of things that your parents did? >> never. >> hello, it's midday here in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington. there's been a new twist to the sex scandal engulfing the american military top brass there. on friday, general david petraeus resigned as boss of the c.i.a. after it was revealed that he had been having an extra marital affair. now general john alan has been drawn into the scandal after what is being called inappropriate communications with a woman also linked to the affair. he has denied any wrong doing, but his application for a top nato job has been put on hold. >> there will be moments like this -- >> another top american commander, another career threatened. this time it's general john allen. he's in charge of u.s. forces in afghanistan, and he was about to be confirmed as the supr
of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events and an undertaking producing a series of transition issues on key issues, and research staff and by outsi
in new york as the region struggles to recover from the super storm sandy. >> syria and eu membership on the agenda and talks between angela merkel and the turkish prime minister. >> european and north african countries have kicked off negotiations on a huge solar energy project in the sahara desert. u.s. president barack obama has arrived in new jersey to tour the devastation left in the wake of super storm sandy. >> obama was joined by new jersey governor chris christie, who is republican, but christie has praised the way the president has handled the crisis. they viewed storm damage by helicopter. obama will also be meeting with residents and emergency workers. >> cleanup work is in full swing on the east coast after sandy flooded cities, washed out bridges, and caused billions of dollars in damage. >> but new york city is making it clear it is back in business. mayor michael bloomberg rate in the opening bell at the new york stock exchange, which was closed for two days. >> the storm killed over 40 people on the east coast and caused unprecedented damage. >> life is slowly returni
assad vows to live and die in syria, striking a violent note as the violence continues. and born into indian royalty, she risk her life behind enemy lines during world war ii. today she is finally honored for sacrifice. >> welcome to our viewers on public television and also around the globe and. tonight, the princess is installing the menu are going to leave china -- the process to install the men who are going to lead and china is under way. the outgoing china -- the outgoing president told them the correction is so-called -- so bad in china it could threaten leadership of the state. >> two days after america elected its president, china has begun the process of anointing its next leader. but no election here, instead, 2000 communist party delegates, including many from the army gathered for their progress. .hina's 1.3 billion people the communist party has reform in china, but not in a normal way. it is an anomaly. is an authoritarian regime running the world's second- biggest economy. modern leaders paying homage to pass commonness, mouse at all -- mao tse tung included. >> w
from abroad. >>> israeli military officials say they fired what they called a warning shot into syria. they say they responded after a stray shell landed in the israeli occupied golan heights. a defense official said a shell fired from syria landed near a military post, and the officials say they realize it was a mistake. still, they returned fire with an anti-tank missile. this is the first time israeli units have fired on syria since the 1973 middle east war. they've tried to stay out of the fighting there, but gunfire hit a military vehicle earlier in month. israeli officials say they filed aa complaint with the united nations, which monitors the cease-fire between the two countries. prime minister benjamin netanyahu told his cabinet that the country is prepared for any contingency. israel captured part of the gol aan heights from syria in the 1967 middle east war. the two sides later agreed to a treaty to establish a demilitarized zone. >>> many investors are wondering where the japanese economy is head headed. we have more from the business de desk. what are investors looking at
rise between syria and israel. it is a fortress like no other. how did one intruder slipped past security to get his hands on the keys to the tower of london? on publice to our viewers television and around the globe. the conflict in syria has widened with israel saying it will respond with severity if any more mortars landed in the heights. this has happened twice and wise israel has responded. today with direct hits on syrian units. the violence comes at the same time as the arab league has recognized the newly formed syrian opposition bloc as legitimate. on the ground, aircraft co. continued their bombardment. >> the war is brought perilously close to the turkish border. one of the bombs brought by syrian air force jets exploded barely 10 meters from the frontier, shattering windows and the turkish side. activists had several people were killed in the bombing. government forces try to recapture the town that fell to the rebels last week. the hostilities that more refugees streaming across the border. turkish ambulances were standing by to cope. with 120,000 refugees in camps i
of aggression from iran we will speak with a former intelligence officer coming up next. and syria's president bashar al-assad's defiant message about his future. [ male announcer ] yep, there's 8 layers of ole grain fiber in those mini-wheats® biscuits... to help keep you full... ♪ 45 buels of wheat on the farm. 45 bushels of wheat! ♪ ...all mning long. there's a big breakft... [ mini ] yeehaw! ...in those fun little biscuits. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. >>shepard: now the new pentagon report that iran fired on an unarmed u.s. drone in international airspace. the c.e.o. of the washington, dc, consulting firm. what do you make of this? >>guest: two points. one, does this mean they can track our aircraft better? one went down over iran last year and they gathered intelligence. there have been newspaper stories about china and others collecting i
. >> and seeking clarity -- german chancellor angel merkel on how to develop renewable energy. we begin in syria where the military is currently stepping up its use of airpower in an effort to defeat the rebels. >> opposition forces say at least 70 people have been killed in an air strike near the turkish border. meanwhile, a video emerges of what appears to be opposition fighters executing government soldiers. >> the un says that if the video is authenticated, the action would constitute a war crime. >> as their prisoners cower in terror, rebels celebrate. this video is said to of been recorded in northwestern syria. government forces and rebels have been fighting there for weeks. on thursday, rebels stormed several army checkpoints. they appear to have captured these government soldiers. in the video, rebels yell, "you are assad's dogs" at their captives, and then they prayed. after that, they fired round after round, killing at least 10 of those prisoners. the united nations is trying to verify the video and says the killings probably constituted a war crime and those responsible should be pu
with washington on a number of issues, from the war in syria to missile defense in europe. >> here, that ties are viewed as the norm, but that is not normal. it does damage. it prevents russia from fulfilling important tasks, especially the long-overdue process of modernization. >> right now, putin is keeping tight control on things at home, and he uses his opposition to america to rally the masses behind him. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for international and security affairs here in berlin. are we likely to see a second attempt at a reset of relations with moscow? >> a couple of months ago, the u.s. president indicated through russian counterparts that after the election, he would have more flexibility -- the u.s. president indicated to his russian counterparts. i think there is more room for political initiatives. i think the cooperation will remain limited, given the domestic situation in russia. >> let me ask you -- the obama administration during its first four years shift
elected leader of syria's main opposition group today criticized the international community for not doing enough to help overthrow the regime of bashar al-assad. he told russian tv there is no civil war. >> reporter: syria is being laid to waste. shattered by 20 months of grinding conflict that's turned cities into war zones, and once-peaceful neighborhoods into rubble. today, two suicide bombers killed at least 20 government soldiers according to opposition groups. the target was a military facility in dura, where the syrian uprising began last year amid hopes that the regime could be toppled. instead, the government is determined to stay in power. and tens of thousands of syrians have paid with their lives. this young boy survived an attack that tore through concrete walls. he was carried away, but not to safety. because he lives in a country at war with itself. yesterday, 11,000 syrians fled their country in one of the biggest exoduses since the fighting began. most crossed into turkey, driven by deadly clashes close to the border in the town ras al-ayn. more than 400,000 syrian refuge
has become the first european nation to recognize syria's newly formed opposition coalition. he says the country will consider arming the opposition in the group forms a transitional government. >> translator: what took place in doha is very important. a coalition was formed. i announce here that france recognizes the syrian national coalition as the sole representative of the syrian people. >> french leaders have been reluctant to provide weapons. they said rebel groups were fragmented. representatives of more than 50 opposition groups formed their coalition in qatar on sunday. six member nations of the council including qatar and sai arab alrea bacd the group. the fighting in syria is forcing more and more people to flee. the united nations high commissioner for refugees says more than 400,000 have crossed borders since the uprising began last year. unhcr staff say people are pouring into turkey, lebanon, and other neighboring countries. they say 2.5 million displaced citizens need humanitarian aid, based on information from the syrian arab red crescent. an tifist says they're havi
. but these are some of the lucky ones. having escaped the fighting in syria, they face a different challenge. in jordan, the winter can bring miracle dangers with heavy rain and subzero temperatures. thousands of children do not have the necessary shelter or clothing to ensure survival. >> they love their country. they are displaced refugees. they did not -- they came in summertime. they have nothing for winter. they need to be prepared for winter. >> save the children warrants to hundred thousand old rubles children could be among those that struggle the most. many have fled over the syrian border in a variety of direction. there are 2 million others displaced in the country. more are expected to escape. this was the border in northern syria today. it is those that do not reach the care of international agencies for whom the danger is greatest. save the children says some refugees have not been able to watch for more than a fortnight because the only water is ice cold. that brings concerns about sanitation and disease. inside syria, fighting continues to rage. the 400,000 serious -- syrians
not be such a big difference. >> right, the key issue was the head of many of the imminent issues. like syria. >> yes, syria. syria, most likely will continue to be a central relationship. but this is a current affair that will likely be settled in another way. the problem is that we do not have any new agenda with the united states, we are still digesting the remnants of the cold war. >> sorry that we cannot speak longer. it was good to get your perspective. thank you. much more reaction coming through all the time, that is it from washington, d.c. for now. we have had an extraordinary night, let's remind ourselves of the highlights of this u.s. presidents election. >> i just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. his supporters and campaign also deserve congratulations. >> we will forever be the united states of america. we will continue our journey forward. this is why we live in the greatest nation on earth. thank you, america. ♪ >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new yor
approach. and then there's the issue of syria. please say some words about what you see as the next steps with regard to iran, how do we see that unfolding in the time ahead, and then what's the way forward with syria? >> yeah. three things. one, you know, the arab spring turned out to be less spring. probably the better term is the arab awakening, and we're going to go through springs and winters and summers and falls, and it's going to vary country to country, and it's going to take a long time. but look, it was inevitable, unavoidable and actually a good thing that the people of the arab world should start taking some responsibility for their future. and there's just no going back. and it is very much in our interest how these awakenings come out and that they result in societies that are democratic, that are producing a better life for their people, and we should do everything we can in a smart way recognizing we're not so popular in the middle east right now to try to help get that outcome. there are a couple big threats to that. one is syria, and i'm more worried about syria in term
military post. it's the first time israel has fired on syria since 1973. >>> syria's rebel groups may be pulling together after pressure from the u.s. and arab nations. op ligs leaders met today and agreed to form a new umbrella coalition to transition into a new syrian government. it's considered a big step in the push to oust president bashar al assad. the government is fighting to e destabilize syria. the civil war started 20 months ago. 35,000 lives may have been lost. and we want to warn you. this next report shows graphic and disturbing video ofs atrocities. some viewers may consider it very disturbing. as arwa damon reports, heinous attacks may have become too familiar in syria. >> reporter: this is video from earlier this year. they crawled through holes and find an entire family killed by regime forces they say. a woman's body lies on the floor. in the room next to it bodies crowded into the corner. more dead are in the bathroom. a small voice whimpers from another room. a child comes into view crawling over a body. he's the only survivor. the assad regime has always maintain
for political solutions? the current policy that we have in syria, where we seem to be attempting to limit the regional influence on the air world, are we doing the right thing when i'm not -- are we doing too much. i cannot end without mentioning the palestinian question. more often i hear the argument that the argument is dead and that is a shame. because if we are going to negotiate with iran, it might be intelligent to do more than just talk about the nuclear issue. it might be better to talk about the full range of issues that are between us. at one point in time, iran indicated that willingness to talk about this and interest in doing their best. i think it makes in that region on all of these of concern concerns. we have a number of studies that are looking at the costs and benefits. the costs are very significant. i would like to mention one study that i think is something that hasn't been done in other studies. that is a study by trita parsi that details the human casualties in war from the toxic chemical fumes and the radioactivity. on both sides of the gulf. that is something yo
obama facing a world of challenges in his second term. from iran's nuclear ambitions to syria's bloody civil war, spilling into neighboring countries now where the president has a lot on his plate. now he has a second chance to tackle a lot of these complex world problems. nicolas burns, former undersecretary for political affairs and was the lead u.s. negotiator on iran's nuclear program. ambassador burns, joining us here. the president has a ton on his plate now. i want to start off with iran. the president criticized throughout the campaign for not being tougher on iran when it comes to his nuclear ambitions for not drawing more of a clear red line, if you will, and we saw israeli president benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister there, famously at the u.n. nick, what do you think is the biggest challenge that the president has to deal with for iran? >> well, you know, suzanne, i think the president has a lot of support here in the united states, and he certainly does around the world for his basic policy, which is we should try negotiations with the iranians before we think about th
. they are interesting. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
. >> syria rebels claimed another victory at a extended their control and a strategic region. >> bringing truth and reconciliation in an era of forced -- [indiscernible] and welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. the leaders of the european are embarking on what could be a difficult round of negotiations on a long-term budget. they are looking for a deal stretching to 2020, but they are divided on the best way to go. certain countries have been calling for cuts, more current spending levels maintained or even increased. >> as the leaders swept into brussels, the question was, had they come to argue or agree on a seven-year budget? all eyes were on david cameron regarded as the potential spoiler, the leader that insists on a cut. >> to keep the british rebate. >> the prime minister was in the see the key european officials to make his case. a 15 minute meeting became 35 and the prediction after words was a long ways to go. other leaders were arriving at their message was to be ready to compromise. >> they all have some preconditions and they must
or syria you will see that in each of these cases there are significant cases funding and model was hard to do. people like to fight the eastern european case because it was successful. the problem there is there wasn't a nato membership in the e.u. but helped to really drive that political role and meet the commitment of the government to undertake the reform. certainly for a country like tunisia. what they're looking at interestingly enough are the cases of south korea, taiwan and south africa as examples of places that have undergone a similar authoritarian transitions to the space rule, particular emphasis on the police and internal capability. >> i'm very glad you mentioned those last few cases that may in fact pulled out some opportunities from learning because if we hadn't integrated that possibility into the way this group responded to the question i would have underscored just how potentially significance the absence of prior model is for the securities sector reform in the arab world because it causes a great deal about the limited validity of what we often think about as best
military says it has scored direct hits on targets in syria as israeli tanks opened fire after a syrian mortar shell landed at an israeli base in the golan heights. israel warning the united nations that while the response is measured this time, it will respond with greater force if is syria's civil war continued to spill over the border into israel. the israeli strike was the first direct engagement with syria in nearly 40 years. this image shows the destruction in the goal hahn heights during the 1973 yom kippur war. we'll have much more on the developing story. jenna: a frightening robbery caught on camera. how police think the suspects may have used superstorm sandy to their advantage. we'll have that. >>> dozens of people left homeless after a deadly house explosion destroys an entire main hood. what caused this blast? we're live with the latest on that mystery next. rick: right now some new information on some crime stories we're keeping an eye on for you. testimony concluding in the preliminary hearing for an american soldier charged with killing 16 afghan civilians. staff sergea
. and then there's the issue of syria. please say some words about what you see as the next steps with regard to iran. how do we see that unfolding in the time ahead? what's the way forward with syria? >> yeah. three things. one, you know, the arab spring turned out to be less spring and probably better term is arab awakening. we're going to go through springs and winters and summers and falls and it's going to vary country to country and it will take a long time. but look, it was iventable, unavoidable and actually a good thing that the people of the arab world should start taking some responsibility for their future. and there's just no going back and it is very much in our interest how these awakenings come out and that they result in societies that are democratic, that are producing a better life for their people and we should do everything we can in a smart way, recognizing we're not so popular in the middle east right now, to try to help get that outcome. there are a couple big threats to that. one is syria and i'm more worried about syria in terms of the middle east then anything and t
. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting israel all through this. made israel feel moderate and the arabs feel realistic. the second piece of good news is that egypt, even under the muslim brotherhood, has an interest in having stability. that's very important. the bad news is the islamists are in control. in the palestinian areas with hamas and certainly in control in egypt. and there's going to be no peace as long as they are there in control, and u.s. policy has got to be a long, gradual process of trying to build up the non-islamists in the arab world, including in iran, across the region. >> that frames it. we'll hear more from you in the roundtable. >>> now let me turn to carl levin, chairman of course of the armed services committee in the senate. senator, to egypt. how concerned are you? is morsi a partner of the united states, or a problem? >> yes.
something they can't take copies with them. >> bret: syria's president says he is not going anywhere. bashar assad is vowing to stay in syria, despite western calls for his departure. in the midst of the syria bloody civil war. correspondent leland vittert has that story from jerusalem. >> incoming missiles and the explosions reverberate around the capital but the rebels can now fire back at the regime. this uncomfortable amateur video shows rebels firing mortals toward what they claim as assad's palaces. in a rare interview broadcast on russian television assad remained defiant. >> many of president assad's seasonals are dying. rebels assault the government barracks in coordinated attac attacks. the video show the government troops who don't die in the battle are executed either in groups or shot in the street. president assad warned the world against coming after him. >> i think if this happened going -- [ inaudible ] >> tough words come as turkey floated the idea deploying american made patriot anti-aircraft missiles along the syrian border to create a safe zone of sorts where zillians an
in a piece in the wall street gorm, that they are coming back everywhere in iraq, in afghanistan, in syria. they're all over the place. so it interferes with the president's narrative. we got bin laden, al qaeda's on the run, therefore, i am a great command in chief. the fact is everything's unraveling in the missed east. >> greta: straight ahead, not just senator mccain, tonight, senator lindy graham firing back. we are here to talk about the heated battle, next. and the real war on women. some women say they are censored by facebook. who are they? allen west, fighting a tough election battle. hew he just got big-name backup. where others fail, droid powers through. introducing the new droid razr maxx hd by motorola. now more than ever droid does. >> senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me. i'm happy to have that discussion with them. but for them to go after the u.n. ambass do, who had nothing to do with benghazi? and was simply making a presentation based on intel jeps that she had received? and to besmirch her reputation? is outra
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